OUT Here

Description

In April 2017, the Nick launched OUT Here– a community-curated and monthly LGBTQ series screening films of all genres.

A group of local folks met in February to brainstorm film selections.  What was the first gay film you saw?  What was the first gay film that changed your life, made you laugh, broke your heart, lifted your imagination, gave you hope?  Those are some of the films we want to see.  

When I first moved to South Carolina, I loved attending the annual Banned in South Carolina festival at the Nickelodeon…Many of the censored films were LGBTQ-themed…This was before Will and Grace, before Ellen, well before Adam Lambert or Caitlyn Jenner. Like a lot of other Southern queers, I had a hunger—a hunger for stories like my own. A film with gay or lesbian or queer characters was an amazing thing to me – that was my life, the life of my friends up there on the screen.  A story like mine, a story like ours.

Usually, though, those films took place somewhere else. Even our legislators, for years, acted as if there weren’t any queer folk here. People like that were always somewhere else, not here.

Well, we’re here. And we’re out. Out here.

Ed Madden, Director of Women’s & Gender Studies
Department of English Language and Literature

 

Special thanks to our series sponsors: 

SC Equality PAC
Burnette Shutt & McDaniel, PA
Darryl Cooper
John Lucas
Robert Keenan and Brian Chen
Lula Drake
Dr. Ed Madden and Bert Easter
Larry Hembree and Joe Hudson
James Hendrick and Richard Irwin
Ruth and Walker Rast

Schedule

May 21

A Kid Like Jake

Brooklyn parents Alex (Claire Danes) and Greg (Jim Parsons) are lucky to have a kid like Jake. Their four-year-old is bright, precocious, creative—and just happens to prefer Disney princesses to toy cars and skirts to jeans. Jake’s “gender-expansive” behavior—as local preschool director Judy (Octavia Spencer) dubs it—is no big deal to Alex and Greg. Or so it seems, until the process of navigating New York City’s hyper-competitive private school system opens up a parental quagmire: could Jake’s gender nonconformity be just the thing that gives their child an edge in the admissions game? How young is too young to put a label on a child’s identity? Is this just a phase, or is Jake truly transgender? Split in their opinions on how to handle the situation, Alex and Greg find themselves navigating an emotional and ethical minefield with one patch of common ground between them: their fierce desire to do what’s right for Jake.

Transparent director Silas Howard helms this timely, honest, emotionally rich look at 21st-century parenting.