OUT Here

Description

In April 2017, the Nick launched OUT Here– a community-curated and monthly LGBTQ series screening films of all genres.

A group of local folks met in February to brainstorm film selections.  What was the first gay film you saw?  What was the first gay film that changed your life, made you laugh, broke your heart, lifted your imagination, gave you hope?  Those are some of the films we want to see.  

When I first moved to South Carolina, I loved attending the annual Banned in South Carolina festival at the Nickelodeon…Many of the censored films were LGBTQ-themed…This was before Will and Grace, before Ellen, well before Adam Lambert or Caitlyn Jenner. Like a lot of other Southern queers, I had a hunger—a hunger for stories like my own. A film with gay or lesbian or queer characters was an amazing thing to me – that was my life, the life of my friends up there on the screen.  A story like mine, a story like ours.

Usually, though, those films took place somewhere else. Even our legislators, for years, acted as if there weren’t any queer folk here. People like that were always somewhere else, not here.

Well, we’re here. And we’re out. Out here.

Ed Madden, Director of Women’s & Gender Studies
Department of English Language and Literature

 

Special thanks to our series sponsors: 

SC Equality PAC
Burnette Shutt & McDaniel, PA
Darryl Cooper
John Lucas
Robert Keenan and Brian Chen
Lula Drake
Dr. Ed Madden and Bert Easter
Larry Hembree and Joe Hudson
James Hendrick and Richard Irwin
Ruth and Walker Rast

Schedule

Apr 28

Gay Chorus Deep South

In response to a wave of discriminatory anti-LGBTQ laws in Southern states and the divisive 2016 election, the San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus embarks on a tour of the American Deep South. Led by Gay Chorus Conductor Dr. Tim Seelig and joined by The Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir, the tour brings a message of music, love and acceptance, to communities and individuals confronting intolerance. Over 300 singers traveled from Mississippi to Tennessee through the Carolinas and over the bridge in Selma, performing in churches, community centers and concert halls in hopes of uniting us in a time of difference. The journey also challenges Tim and other Chorus members who fled the South to confront their own fears, pain and prejudices, on a journey towards reconciliation. What emerges is a less divided America, where the lines that divide us—faith, politics, sexual identity—are erased through the soaring power of music, humanity and a little drag.