JURISCINEMA: The Law On Screen

Description

Engaged with breaking news and urgent conversations about the judicial system, “JURISCINEMA: The Law on Screen” features presentations by some of the Midlands’ foremost legal experts alongside screenings of contemporary and classic legal cinema.

Curated in collaboration with local lawyers, “JURISCINEMA: The Law on Screen” presents powerful contemporary and classic films that illuminate key aspects of the American justice system.

Throughout the series, post-screening conversations will clarify how national legal debates impact residents of the Midlands, tethering iconic films to personal experiences, deepening our understanding of legal concepts and highlighting opportunities for democratic participation.

Thank you to our sponsors:
Burnette Shutt & McDaniel, P.A
John and Nancy Freeman
Richland County Bar Association

Schedule

Sep 25

Hidden Figures: Know Your Rights: Workers and Discrimination

This film is a part of our JURISCINEMA: The Law on Screen series.

Monday, September 25 at 6:30pm

Director: Theodore Melfi

Set in Hampton, Virginia on the eve of John Glenn’s 1962 orbit of earth, Hidden Figures is the inspiring true-story of three brilliant African American female mathematicians as they prepare for the historic NASA launch. Possessing awe-inspiring mathematical, engineering and computational skills, Katherine (Taraji P. Henson), Dorothy (Octavia Spencer) and Mary (Janelle Monáe) work for the Federal Government prior to the passage of the Civil Rights Act and consistently face the ugly realities of discrimination, harassment and segregation. The remarkable story of the women responsible for one of the most impressive engineering feats in American history, Hidden Figures also addresses the cruel inequities that have permeated the American workplace and obscured the role of key figures in shaping history.

A conversation between Nekki Shutt and Joseph K. Dickey follows the screening.

Nekki Shutt is a certified specialist in labor and employment law and has been involved in the employment / human resources field for almost 30 years. She currently has a civil litigation practice with an emphasis on employee benefits (ERISA) and employment law. Nekki was one of the lead attorneys in Condon v. Haley, the 2014 federal lawsuit which made South Carolina the 35 state to recognize marriage equality in the country.

Joseph D. Dickey, Jr. is a partner with Dickey Law Group, LLC where he practices labor and employment and education law. In 2016, Joseph was recognized by The National Black Lawyers as a member of their Top 40 attorneys under 40. In addition, Joseph became a certified circuit court mediator in 2016. Joseph also will be a new chapter author in the Labor and Employment Law for South Carolina Lawyer 2017 edition.

Thank you to our sponsors:
Burnette Shutt & McDaniel, P.A
John and Nancy Freeman
Richland County Bar Association

Oct 02

12 Angry Men: Im/partial Juries

This film is a part of our JURISCINEMA: The Law on Screen series.

Monday, October 2 at 6:30pm

Director: Sidney Lumet

In the classic courtroom tale that launched Sidney Lumet’s career, twelve (white) jurors deliberate a racially-charged murder case behind closed doors. When juror # 8 dissents (a career defining performance from Henry Fonda), questioning his peers’ ready insistence on the defendant’s guilt, tensions and biases quickly come to the fore. Set during the decline of HUAC and in the midst of the Civil Rights movement, the film is a thoughtful study of a divided America.

Underlying the film’s dramatization of antagonism amongst jurors who privilege either stringent retribution or reasonable doubt as cornerstones of the justice system is the long and fraught history of American juries. Though frequently referenced, the meaning of a jury of one’s peers remains heavily contested and has been the subject of Supreme Court scrutiny as recently as 2017( Pena-Rodriguez v. Colorado ).

A conversation with Dave Maxfield of the Richland County Bar Association follows the screening.

Dave Maxfield is the President of the Richland County Bar Association, he is the three-time Chairman of the Consumer Law section of the South Carolina Bar and a member of the National Association of Consumer Advocates (NACA) and Public Investors Arbitration Bar Association (PIABA). For over 20 years, he has represented individual consumers in cases against banks, credit reporting agencies, debt collectors and insurance companies. He has obtained one of the highest punitive damage verdicts in America against a creditor in a credit reporting case, and has secured numerous significant recoveries on behalf of consumers in individual cases.

Thank you to our sponsors:
Burnette Shutt & McDaniel, P.A
John and Nancy Freeman
Richland County Bar Association

Oct 09

The House I Live In: Criminal Justice and Mass Incarceration

This film is a part of our JURISCINEMA: The Law on Screen series.

Monday, October 9 at 6:30pm

Director: Eugene Jarecki

This investigation of the criminal justice system by award-winning filmmaker Eugene Jarecki, blends personal insights with systemic analysis, as the director sets out to understand the economically, socially and culturally devastating impact of the War on Drugs. Surveying policy from throughout the 20th and 21st centuries, The House I Live In examines how American racism and economic disparity – as manifest in the development of narcotics squads, strategies for policing, housing segregation, ghettoization, and the financial tolls of incarceration – have resulted in the disastrously disproportionate incarceration of Americans of color.

A conversation with Bill Nettles follows the screening.

Bill Nettles is the former United States Attorney for the State of South Carolina (2010-2015), serving in the role for longer than any US Attorney for South Carolina since the 1960s. From 1992-1995 he worked in the Richland County Public Defender's Office and has also worked in criminal defense in private practice. In 2011 Nettles launched a statewide community policing initiative.

Thank you to our sponsors:
Burnette Shutt & McDaniel, P.A
John and Nancy Freeman
Richland County Bar Association

Oct 16

To Kill A Mockingbird: The Arc of Justice: The Law and Civil Rights

This film is a part of our JURISCINEMA: The Law on Screen series.

Monday, October 16 at 6:30pm

Director: Robert Mulligan

Based on Harper Lee’s Pulitzer-Prize winning novel, To Kill a Mockingbird is one of the most beloved legal films of all time. Set in 1930s rural Alabama, To Kill a Mockingbird is the story of Atticus Finch, an attorney defending Tom Robinson, an African American man falsely accused of assaulting a white woman before an all white jury. Released seven years after the murder of Emmett Till and two years before the Supreme Court case Swain v. Alabama emboldened attorneys’ use of peremptory challenges to create all-white juries (a decision later overturned in Batson v. Kentucky), To Kill a Mockingbird is a moving story of the fight for justice in the face of deeply entrenched institutional racism that remains as powerful and relevant today as it was at the time of its release.

A conversation with Luther J. Battiste, III and M. Malissa Burnette follows the screening.

Luther J. Battiste, III entered the political arena in 1983 and made history by becoming one of the first two African-Americans elected to Columbia City Council since Reconstruction. He served fifteen years as a member of the Columbia City Council including two terms as Mayor Pro Tempore. In 1998, the City of Columbia dedicated to Luther J. Battiste, III the Monument and Plaza in honor of his dedicated service as a public servant. Battiste has served as president of the Columbia Lawyers Association, the Richland County Bar, Association, the South Carolina Trial Lawyers Association, and The Southeastern Region of the American Board of Trial Advocates (SEABOTA).

Malissa Burnette is a partner in the Burnette Shutt & McDaniel law firm in Columbia. Ms. Burnette has been a Certified Specialist in Employment and Labor Law since 1993. Ms. Burnette has been involved in several ground-breaking cases, including Mellette. v. Jones, which opened the doors of The Citadel to female students, and Tara Bailey v. SC High School League, which allowed girls in South Carolina public schools to play contact sports. In 2014, she represented Police Chief Crystal Moore of Latta, SC, and achieved her reinstatement. Chief Moore had been fired by the Mayor, who was caught on tape in a homophobic tirade. In 2014, Ms. Burnette was one of the lead attorneys in Condon and Bleckley v. SC Attorney General Alan Wilson, South Carolina’s marriage equality lawsuit that was upheld by the United States Supreme Court in June 2015.

Thank you to our sponsors:
Burnette Shutt & McDaniel, P.A
John and Nancy Freeman
Richland County Bar Association