Columbia Jewish Film Festival

Description

The mission of the Columbia Jewish Film Festival is to offer outstanding world cinema that promotes awareness, appreciation, and pride in the diversity of the Jewish experience. Reaching out to the greater Columbia area, the Festival’s aim is to educate, illuminate, and entertain through film—including history, language, people, the State of Israel, and the history of the Jewish people from pre-biblical to modern times.

For more information, visit the festival website here.

Location

The Nickelodeon Theatre

Schedule

Oct 09

Bye Bye Germany

Frankfurt, 1946. David Bermann (Moritz Bleibtreu) and his Jewish friends have escaped the Nazi regime and are now dreaming of leaving for America. But how will they get the money in these tough post-war times? The smooth-talking businessman focuses on what the Germans now need most: fine bed linens nicely wrapped in amusing stories! The six talented entertainers go from home to home, praising housewives with ashy chutzpah until the flattered ladies have no choice but to buy their irresistible items. Business flourishes and a bright new future can be seen on the horizon, but questions about Bermann's past catch up with him.

Directed by Sam Garbaski.

Please join us after the screening for a reception in the lobby, hosted by the Columbia Jewish Film Festival.

Oct 14

Above the Drowning Sea

As Hitler’s forces sought to expel the Jews from Europe, no other country would open its doors to the refugees. With their lives at stake, the refugees desperately looked for an escape from the coming Holocaust. Then, a door opened on the east coast of far-away China—Shanghai, an “open city” itself in chaos from foreign invasion and civil war. But getting there required a golden document to get out of Nazi Europe—a visa from China.

Above the Drowning Sea recounts the courageous intervention of Ho Feng Shan, the Chinese Consul in Vienna, who defied his own government and braved the Gestapo to issue visas to the refugees.

Directed by René Balcer.

Please join us after the screening for a reception in the lobby, hosted by the Columbia Jewish Film Festival.

Oct 14

Shelter

Mossad agent Naomi (Neta Riskin) is called back from sick leave and assigned to a "babysitting" job. Under a new identity, she heads to Germany to protect Mona (Golshifteh Farahani), a Lebanese informant, who is hidden in a Hamburg safe house while recovering from plastic surgery. Naomi learns that Mona is close to a top Hezbollah leader, a man dead-set on exacting revenge. In this game of deception, beliefs are questioned and choices are made that are not their own. During the two weeks they spend together, an unexpected bond forms between the two women and their fate takes a surprising turn in this suspenseful, elegant neo-noir.

Directed by Eran Riklis.

Please join us after the screening for a reception in the lobby, hosted by the Columbia Jewish Film Festival.

Oct 16

An Act of Defiance

Ten political activists (Nelson Mandela and his inner circle of Black and Jewish supporters) face a death sentence for conspiracy to commit sabotage after they are arrested by the apartheid South African government. Bram Fischer (Peter Paul Muller), a sympathetic lawyer, risks his career and freedom to defend the men, attempting to hide the fact that he, too, frequently convened on the farm where they were arrested.

Directed by Jean van de Velde.

Please join us after the screening in the lobby for a reception hosted by the Columbia Jewish Film Festival.

 

Oct 21

The Last Suit

Cranky, crafty, and always immaculately dressed, aged master tailor Abraham Bursztein (Miguel Angel Sola) finds himself facing his winter years in a retirement home after discovering his children have sold his home out from under him. Not one to go quietly and feeling the pressure of a secret lifelong debt bearing down on him, Abraham unexpectedly sets out from Buenos Aires. His destination? Poland—a country whose name he refuses to utter—in order to deliver a suit to childhood friend Piotrek, who once saved Abraham's life during the waning days of the Nazi occupation. From an unexpected setback in Madrid to the train station in Paris where he faces the reality of having to travel through Germany, Abraham slowly comes to face a lifetime of choices often made in anger, leading to an emotional reckoning with his past in this funny and deeply tender new film.

Directed by Pablo Solarz.

Please join us in the lobby after the screening for a reception hosted by the Columbia Jewish Film Festival.

Oct 21

Student Short Film Competition Showcase

This event is free and open to the public.

Join us to celebrate the work of student filmmakers from across South Carolina. This year, students were asked to create a three to six-minute film using the theme Lo Ta’amod, a concept defined as not standing by while others are threatened or mistreated with rudeness, bullying, violence, racism, or intolerance.

The following four awards will be announced:

Winner - Middle School Division - $250 prize
Winner - High School Division - $250 prize
Winner - College Division - $250 prize
Best of Show Winner - $500 prize

Registration for entries will remain open through September 28, 2018. For information on entering, visit the Columbia Jewish Film Festival website here.

This event is free and open to the public.

Oct 23

Scandal in Ivansk

In the small Polish town of Ivansk, one word ignites a nationwide controversy. Most of Ivansk’s Jews were killed by the Nazis, and the headstones in the Jewish cemetery were plundered for construction purposes. A group of descendants of Ivansk Jews restores the town’s cemetery, retrieving what headstones they can. When they commission a plaque that includes the word “collaborator,” a national scandal is unleashed. This eye-opening documentary strives to understand why much of the nation won’t accept “collaborator” to describe Polish people who aided the Nazis and benefitted from the genocide of Jews.

Directed by Ami Drozd and David Blumenfeld.

Please join us in the lobby after the screening for a reception in the lobby hosted by the Columbia Film Society.

Oct 28

Shalom Bollywood: The Untold Story of Indian Cinema

Full of unexpected delights, Shalom Bollywood tells of the Jewish stars that dominated early Indian cinema. When the world’s largest film industry began, it was frowned upon for Hindu and Muslim women to appear on screen. So their roles were played by India’s Jewish community, Baghdadi and Bene Israel descendants that faced no taboos about performing in public. From the silent era through Bollywood’s golden age, Indian cinema icons share their highs and lows and how their careers pushed the boundaries of Indian-Jewish culture. Interviews plus rare archival footage and retro-style music and animation, revive the all-singing, all-dancing, cheeky feel of a Bollywood production.

Directed by Danny Ben-Moshe.

Join us in the lobby after the screening for a reception hosted by the Columbia Jewish Film Festival.