Black Stories: Two Cities

Description

“Black Stories: Two Cities” celebrates Black filmmakers as key narrators of American experience and activists in fights for liberation and equity. Featuring a formally eclectic array of films produced in cities throughout the United States, this series explores the economic, political, and personal forces that shape the built environment.

Thank you to our series sponsor:
Bakari Sellers

Schedule

Feb 05

Crooklyn

This program is part of our Black Stories: Two Cities series.

A post-screening conversation with author Dianne Johnson-Feelings, Sybil Rosado, and artist Michaela Pilar-Brown accompanies the program.

Crooklyn

Director: Spike Lee

A masterful family film from acclaimed filmmaker Spike Lee, Crooklyn immerses the viewer in 1973 Bedford-Stuyvesant. Told from the perspective of Troy, the only girl amongst a rambunctious cadre of brothers, the film’s depiction of squabbles between neighbors and sticky summer treats powerfully evokes the ties that bind community.

1994. USA. 115 min. PG-13

preceded by 

Split Ends, I Feel Wonderful

Director: Akosua Adoma Owusu

A swirling found-footage collage of women’s hairstyles and salons in 1970s New York set to archival audio that contrasts differing perspectives on hair, pride, and independence.

2012. USA. 4 min. NR

Speakers:

Dianne Johnson-Feelings is a Professor of English Language and Literature at USC, where she teaches courses on children's literature, writing, and African-American film. She is a celebrated author of children's books including Hair Dance (2007) and Black Magic (2009). Her work "celebr(ates) Blackness in its many manifestations."

Michaela Pilar-Brown is a visual artist working in mixed media, photography, and sculpture. Her work explores the body through the prisms of age, gender, race, sexuality and history. She is a member of the leadership team of Indie Grits Labs.

Sybil Rosado is an anthropologist and Professor of Social Science at Benedict College. She has received funding to study perceptions and interpretations of hair amongst women of the African Diaspora from the Mellon Fellowship and the Fulbright Hayes Grant.

Thank you to our series sponsor:
Bakari Sellers

Feb 12

Bless Their Little Hearts

This program is part of our Black Stories: Two Cities series.

Bless Their Little Hearts

Director: Billy Woodberry

A stunning neo-realist film that applies techniques from global revolutionary cinemas to tell the story of a South Los Angeles family contending with the challenges of unemployment and economic hardship. A patient navigation of everyday life and domesticity that is as tender and candid as it is heartbreaking.

1984. USA. 80 min. NR

preceded by 

When it Rains

Director: Charles Burnett

On New Year’s Day a man (Pan African Film Festival founder Ayuko Babu) tries to help a woman make rent. A lighthearted story of community collaboration and a gorgeous document of Leimert Park, one of the creative hearts of Black Los Angeles.  

1995. USA. 13 min. NR

Thank you to our series sponsor:
Bakari Sellers

Feb 19

"I am Somebody" with "Brick by Brick"

This program is part of our Black Stories: Two Cities series.

I am Somebody

Director: Madeline Anderson

A groundbreaking documentary about a successful 1969 union strike led by Black hospital workers that Civil Rights leader Fannie Lou Hammer hailed as “of decisive importance to all of us.” Exceptional in its clear-eyed depiction of class struggle, women’s experiences, and the financial disparities and racial inequities often concealed by Charleston’s tourism industry.

1970. USA. 30 min. NR

Brick by Brick

Director: Shirikiana Aina

A striking portrait of gentrification in 1970s Washington D.C. that allows residents to speak for themselves about their changing neighborhoods. Inspired by revolutionary movements worldwide, subjects discuss the global struggle against displacement and community efforts to retain property and power.

1982. USA. 33 min. NR

Thank you to our series sponsor:
Bakari Sellers

Thank you to screening sponsor:
University of South Carolina: College of Arts and Sciences

Feb 26

Flag Wars

This program is part of our Black Stories: Two Cities series.

A post-screening conversation with Dr. Ed Madden and Dr. Todd Shaw about race, gender, and gentrification accompanies the program.

Director: Linda Goode Bryant and Laura Poitras

Prompted by filmmaker Goode Bryant’s inquiry: “Does it look different when two historically oppressed groups try to live together?” Flag Wars is an exceptionally thoughtful, in-depth study of the emotional, economic, and infrastructural motivations and effects of white, gay and lesbian home buyers acquiring property in a historically African-American neighborhood of Columbus, Ohio.  

Ed Madden is a professor of English Language & Literature and Director of Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of South Carolina. His research addresses gender, sexuality, and modernism.

Todd Shaw holds appointments in the University of South Carolina’s Political Science and African American studies programs. He researches and teaches broadly in the areas of African American politics, urban politics and public policy, as well as citizen activism and social movements. His current research considers how class, gender, age and other social factors create differing definitions of what constitutes African American group interests and how groups of African Americans and their allies have acted upon these perceived interests. His publications include Now is the Time! Detroit Black Politics and Grassroots Activism.

 

Thank you to our series sponsor:
Bakari Sellers